the things you need to know…


Can gas hearth appliances burn either Propane or Natural Gas?

They can burn one or the other, but not both. You need to be sure the gas hearth appliance you have is set up for the type of gas fuel you intend to burn. Conversion kits are available which will allow a unit to be changed to match the proper fuel type.

Can I burn wood in my gas hearth appliance?

No! Burning anything other than natural or LP gas in a gas fireplace or stove will create a potential fire hazard and present a danger to your home and its occupants. Only burn the gas fuel for which the unit was originally designed.

Can I convert my gas appliance to burn wood?


Can I install a TV above my gas fireplace?

Only the TV manufacturer can say what is safe for the TV. Be sure to maintain the clearances specified for your fireplace to combustibles above when putting anything over a gas fireplace.

Can I change the way the logs are arranged in my gas hearth appliance?

Not on a direct vent or B vent model. A gas fireplace is an engineered system that includes the firebox, burner, logs, venting and options which are tested and listed by AGA or UL. Changing any of the specifications or placement of the logs could void your manufacturer's warranty, and possibly even your homeowner's warranty.

Can I use my existing masonry chimney for my new gas fireplace?

No, a masonry chimney is not appropriate for venting a gas fireplace, BUT we can show you a gas fireplace insert that can utilize your existing fireplace.

Does a direct vent gas hearth appliance have to vent out an exterior wall?

No, with today’s venting options, direct vents can go literally anywhere in the home. The vent can terminate vertically through the roof or horizontally through an exterior wall. We’d be happy to review your location and come up with a venting plan for your appliance.

How can I find my model and serial number?

Each fireplace has a rating plate either inside the operating door or in the lower controls cavity. On that rating plate is your model number and serial number. Gas burning fireplaces and inserts have a serial/model/rating plate in the lower cavity controls area. Gas stoves have a serial/model/rating plate attached to the back of the stove or inside the pedestal base.

Does the cost of the gas hearth appliance include everything I’ll need?

No. The Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (MSRP) shown on the price list includes the fireplace or appliance only. Fronts, piping, surrounds, gas or electric connections, and installation will be in addition to this suggested price. Everyone’s situation is different so pricing needs to customized for you.

How do I clean my gas logs?

Do not use water or cleaner of any kind on your logs. You can carefully remove them to take outside and brush off with a very soft brush. Just be sure to replace them in the exact order shown in your owner’s manual diagram.

How do I clean my glass?

It is very important to clean your glass after the initial 3 hours of burn time. Failure to do so can cause permanent etching of your glass. 1) Make sure your glass is completely cooled. It is also recommended to turn the gas off when servicing your appliance. 2) Remove the front face or louvers of your fireplace; carefully remove the glass assembly of your fireplace (following the instructions in your manual) and lay it on a soft surface. 3) Wipe both sides with household glass cleaner (do not use a product with ammonia), using a soft cloth. 4) For heavy deposits, use Stove Bright Glass Cleaner , Rutland White Off Glass Cleaner, or other hard water deposit glass cleaner recommended by your servicing dealer. 5) Carefully replace glass on front of fireplace (following the instructions in your manual), making sure glass assembly and front are secured. 6) After this initial cleaning, clean your glass as often as necessary, particularly if adding new ember material. Never use any abrasive cleaners or cloths to clean your glass. Scratching can cause the glass to shatter.

How do I take off the glass?

Refer to the owner’s manual for you appliance for instructions for removing the glass.

Is direct vent the same as vent-free?

No, absolutely not. A direct vent uses a high temperature glass panel to seal off the burn area of the fireplace from the interior of the home. It pulls 100% combustion air to feed the fire from outside the home. Because of its design, a direct vent gas fireplace will not affect the indoor air quality of your home. Since no air from your home is going up the chimney, a direct vent model is very efficient. Vent free should actually be called room vented since the by-products of gas combustion all spill back into the room. The single largest by-product of the gas combustion process is water vapor. Over sizing or overuse of a vent free hearth product can lead to excess moisture in a well built, tightly constructed home. Excess moisture inside the home can contribute to odors, mold and mildew inside the home.

The glass on my gas fireplace is very hot!

The glass on a gas fireplace WILL reach very high temperatures. USE CAUTION: Carefully SUPERVISE children in the same room as your appliance; alert everyone to the hazards of high temperatures; do NOT operate with protective barriers removed; keep clothing, furniture, draperies and other combustibles away. Barriers such as screens over our direct vent glass help reduce the risk of burn from touching the glass. Ask us bout freestanding screens that are available.

My mantel feels really hot

While direct vent gas fireplaces are designed principally for their aesthetic value, we try to get as much heat output as possible to provide added value to the homeowner. It should be noted that while we are getting a lot of heat, we are passing the ANSI and UL standards for combustible temperatures. The allowable is 117°F above room temperature for combustibles. Average room temperature is 70-75°F; therefore a 187-192°F surface temperature can be expected. On a solid surface, 150°F is very hot to the touch (to put this in perspective, water boils at 212°F and the average bath water temperature is 110°F). What feels hot to your skin is still very safe for your mantel.

What is the recommended “curing” time for my new gas fireplace?

On a new gas fireplace there is a curing time. When initially burning your new gas fireplace, the oils, etc. from manufacturing will be burning off the fireplace. We recommend burning the fireplace 3 hours; completely cooling down the fireplace, removing the glass and cleaning it with household glass cleaner or Glass Bright; replacing the glass & continuing to burn the fireplace an additional 9-21 hours. (Make sure you re-latch the glass so it is securely fastened on your fireplace.) If necessary, open a window to release any odor during this process. This should eliminate the manufacturing smell on a new fireplace.

Why doesn’t my fan come on right away?

Most fans are wired into the fireplace with a fan sensor switch. This switch will activate the blower when the firebox heats up to a certain temperature. It will also automatically turn the blower off when the fireplace is turned off and the unit cools to a certain temperature. This sensor is provided so that you will not be circulating cold air in your home. The amount of time needed to heat up the fan sensor will differ depending on the model of your fireplace. It is common that blowers installed in Firebrick products will take longer to sense the heat and turn on your blower. Firebrick has greater insulating characteristics and holds the heat inside your firebox resulting in higher radiant heat and greater efficiencies

Can I use my gas appliance when the electric power is out?

If your model has a standing pilot light, it does not require house current at any time to operate; or if your appliance has our patented IPI or IPI+ System, which works on a battery back up of 2 "D" or 4 "AA" batteries (depending on the particular ignition system), it will work in event of a power outage. You will need to install batteries for operation. If you have a fan or a remote control option, they will not work without power, but the appliance itself will burn and provide heat. (If you have a remote control, you may need to operate the appliance with the ON/Off switch in the control area of the appliance).


What are the benefits of heating with pellets versus gas, oil or electric?

There are lots of benefits to burning wood pellets versus other fuels. The wide availability of pellets makes this fuel type both convenient and affordable while providing a fantastic alternative to chopping wood for a comparable heating experience. When compared to gas, oil and electricity, pellets are a much more sustainable option. They are both renewable and clean burning which is good for the environment. The bonus is that they are also usually less expensive.

What are pellets made of?

Pellets are made of sawdust waste from lumber mills and furniture factories, that is extruded through a mill and compressed into pellets by the same process used to make rabbit feed. It is then bagged into 40 pound bags- 50 to a ton.

What is the best way to store them?

Store pellets in a cool, dry place where they are protected from weather and high humidity.. Inside is best.

Do pellets go bad?

Pellets only go bad if they are exposed to the elements, especially moisture. If they get wet, they will be ruined.

Do I need a chimney for a pellet stove?

Your pellet appliance requires an approved venting system.to operate safely. It does not have to be a traditional brick or stone chimney higher than the highest point of the house though. Our sales associates can show you the venting system that is right for your application.

Do I have to have an existing fireplace to use a pellet insert?

Most of our pellet inserts can be installed as a built-in unit and do not require an existing wood fireplace like some brands do. Ask us about it!


Can I install a wood stove, fireplace or insert myself?

Installation of our hearth products must be done in strict accordance with local or national building codes, and the unit's installation manual. We recommend that our products be installed by a factory-trained professional. You will also want to check with your homeowner’s insurance company as many do not allow DIY installations of hearth appliances. Should you decide to attempt it, make sure you follow all detailed instruction to avoid jeopardizing the safety of your family. Never attempt an installation outside the realm of your expertise.

How does the Quadra- Fire burn system differ from stoves with a catalytic combustor?

The Quadra-Fire wood stoves incorporate secondary burn tubes, which are more efficient, burn cleaner and require less maintenance than stoves with catalytic converters. More than 50% of the heat from your wood stove comes from burning the smoke, and stoves with secondary burn tubes burn that smoke inside the firebox, instead of in your chimney. Generally, the Quadra-Fire wood stoves average fewer emissions versus the EPA standard of 6 grams per hour. They are very clean burning. And, over the life of a catalytic converter stove, you will need to replace the converter several times. This is quite a costly maintenance requirement. You will not need to replace the heat tubes on the Quadra-Fire stoves.

How efficient is a wood burning fireplace?

While they produce some radiant heat, most wood-burning fireplaces are primarily decorative. Even heat circulating models still pull a tremendous amount of air from the home. There are several EPA rated wood-burning models that are efficient and clean burning that we can show you if you want to heat with wood, but like the look of a fireplace.. We also have several wood-burning stoves and inserts that are very efficient.

Should I use glass doors on my fireplace?

Glass doors are a great option for wood burning fireplaces. The doors should always be fully open or fully closed. Glass doors should be fully open when starting a fire and when the fire is burning strongly. The glass doors should be closed as the fire dies down to minimize the amount of room air going up the fireplace chimney. When burning gas logs in a wood-burning fireplace, the glass doors should always be fully open when the gas logs are burning. ALWAYS keep the screen mesh on your fireplace closed when using the fireplace to guard against sparks popping out of the firebox area. If you have a see-through wood-burning fireplace, the doors should be either closed or open on both sides when burning.

If I want to change my wood fireplace to gas, which is better, gas logs or a gas insert?

Your decision really comes down to how much a priority heating efficiency is for you. If you want a lot of heat from your fireplace, you should consider a direct vent gas insert. From a cost standpoint, an insert will cost approximately five times the cost of a nice gas log set. However, since the insert is very efficient, it will pay for itself over a period of a few years in gas bill savings. We offer both a full line of inserts and vented gas logs to choose from. Installing room-vented or vent free log sets in our wood-burning fireplaces is unacceptable. Doing so will void your warranty on the fireplace and possibly your homeowners insurance.

My wood fireplace has a fan, but it doesn’t seem to blow very much.

Our fans are purposely designed at lower CFMs (cubic feet per minute). There are two reasons for this. This first is to minimize fan noise. Second, a high velocity would tend to cool the air temperature coming out of the top louver of the fireplace. The fan is designed to move warm air into the room, not to move air clear across the room.

How can I find my model and serial numbers?

Each fireplace has a rating plate either inside the operating door or in the lower controls cavity. On that rating plate is your model number and serial number. Wood-burning fireplaces have a metal serial/model plate in the upper left side or right side of the firebox, or riveted on the smoke shield behind the screen.